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Race And Gender Essays

Race, Class, And Gender Essay

In Anderson and Collins’, chapter on “Why race, class, and gender still maters” encourage readers to think about the world in their framework of race, class, and gender. They argued that even though society has change and there is a wide range of diversity; race, class and gender still matters. Anderson and Collins stated, “Race, class, and gender matter because they remain the foundation for system of power and inequality that, despite our nation’s diversity, continue to be among the most significant social facts of peoples lives.” (Anderson and Collins, 2010) When I was a little girl, I never knew that people were classified in to groups such as race, class, gender. I knew there were people that had a different color of skin than my color of skin. I knew that there were rich people and poor people, and that there were girls and boys. I saw everyone as being human beings, as being the same and not classified as something. As I was growing up, I started to see the differences in classifications in groups. It was not because I just woke up knowing that there were different classifications, but because I was taught about them in school and society. Anderson and Collins stated, “Race, class and gender shape the experiences of all people in the United States. (2010) This means that experiences that we have gone through in life are formed from a race, class, and gender view.
Being a low-income Hispanic person, I have had a bad experience when shopping in a predominately-white shopping center. I remember a time my aunts and I went to buy clothes at a shopping center in Utah. When we were at a store looking at the clothes we noticed that staff from the store was following us like if we were going to rob something. When we asked for help, they took long in helping us and their attitude was not pleasant. We noticed that when people from their own race were asking for help, they were helped quickly and the staffs were amiable towards them. The staffs made us feel very uncomfortable so we decided to leave the store. In addition, I have noticed that people tend to stayed within their race and culture. For example, some white people stay within their race, they form relationships within their own race, they live in neighborhoods where white people predominate, and they have their own life style, and consider other races lower than theirs. This makes me think about my own Mexican culture. I have heard some of my Central American friends say that Mexicans think they are better than they are. I do not say anything but I know many Mexicans who have said that we are better than other cultures. I have to say we are different in the way that we do integrate and have close friendships with people from other cultures. Unlike some white people, who say they have close relationships with other races, when in reality they do not. Anderson and Collins, stated, “We want readers to understand that race, class, and gender are linked experiences, no one...

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Intersection of Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality define Social Positions in Alice Walkers The Color Purple

1686 words - 7 pages Sedgewick observes, one’s social position is affected by various axis of classification such as gender, sexuality, race, class and the interplay of these social identities. In The Color Purple by Alice walker, Sedgewick’s observations ring true. Celie, the main character in Walker’s novel, is a perfect example of these observations put forth by Sedgewick. Celie’s social position is indicative of her gender, sexuality, race, and class; as a Black...

The Issues of Race, Gender, Class and Homophobia in Physical Education

2615 words - 10 pages In the year 2008, the first black president was elected in the United States, but in the same year, according to the FBI website, there were about 5,600 hate crime offenses classified as crime on race and ethnicity were reported to the police. There were three women justices on the United States Supreme Court for the first time in 2010, but in the same year, full-time working women earn just 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. In...

Class and Gender Roles

1507 words - 6 pages There are many expectations from society about how people should act based on their gender and class. These expectations can have negative effects on a person and how they grow up. An individual can feel torn between their family members and society because he or she is supposedly not fulfilling the expectations. This was the case for Dorothy Allison in her article, "A Question of Class," and Paul in Willa Cather's short story, "Paul's Case: A...

Race and Class Affecting Education

1648 words - 7 pages The decision of Brown vs. Board affected education nationally in 1954 by dismantling racism in schools. For this reason, segregation did not produce affirmative results for implementing equal opportunity in society. Citizens of the United States should receive a suitable education regardless of an individual’s race or class. Unfortunately, society is continuing separation because of the injustice of race and the location of poverty...

Contemporary Issues-Gender and Race Equality

2045 words - 8 pages Gender and Race Equality PAGE 9 Contemporary Issues-Gender and Race EqualityTanya LaForceUniversity of PhoenixCJA/313 Contemporary Issues in Criminal JusticeBrian BuggeSeptember 6, 2008Contemporary Issues-Gender and Race EqualityGender and Race Equality as it relates to the...

Class, Racial and Gender Inequalities in UK

1106 words - 4 pages Inequalities in UK PAGE 1 Running Head: CLASS, RACIAL AND GENDER INEQUALITIES IN UKClass, Racial and Gender Inequalities in United Kingdom[Name of the Writer][Name of the Institution]Class, Racial and Gender Inequalities in United KingdomThe gender gap in wages in numerous countries has been well...

Class and Gender Issues in Medieval Europe.

1644 words - 7 pages In the Middle Ages two things determined one's opportunities in life--gender and social class. Throughout history upper class men have had more chances to move up in life, while women of all classes (especially the poor) did not have many opportunities to change their status. Women's choices and opportunities were different according to social status--upper classes (nobility), middle classes (guildswomen, merchants wives) and the poorest...

Race and Social Class: Education and Criminal Justice System

1437 words - 6 pages America demands that all youth receive an education and that its educational system is free and open to all—regardless of class, race, ethnicity, age, and gender. However, the system is failing. There is still inequality in the educational system, and minorities’ experience with education is shaped by discrimination and limited access, while white people’s experience with education is shaped by privilege and access. The educational experience for...

Comparing Race and Class as Contributing Factors of Social Mobility

1419 words - 6 pages "Everyone believes the face of poverty is black. The white poor blend in, the black poor stand out," suggests social activist Bell Hooks (4). At first glance, Hooks's observation seems statistically relevant: 24.7% of African Americans in the United States were living below poverty level in 2008, compared to 11.2% of whites (DeNavas-Walt, Proctor, and Smith 14). However, this casual analysis fails to compare the size of the two populations,...

Intersecting Factors: Race, Gender and Sexuality in Immigration

2432 words - 10 pages The United States was founded through means of immigration; immigrants from everywhere and anywhere around the world. Who are they? How did they get here? Why did they come? Many of these questions can be answered when considering how race, gender, and sexuality affect immigration. Immigration means something to different to everyone and for some it forced, while for others, it is a choice. For some it means pursuing the “American Dream,” for...

Gender and Race During the U.S. Occupation of Japan

1884 words - 8 pages The Fifteen-Year War was a time of great turmoil and uncertainty in Japan. Various facets of the country were tested and driven to their limits. During the occupation, race and gender began to evolve in ways that had not exactly be seen before. War had a tremendous impact on every part of the life of a Japanese citizen. Both men and women began to fill roles that were completely novel to them. Race became a part of the definition of who people...

Reviews

Reviews of monographs, texts, fiction, references, performances, exhibits, any artifacts and items that may contribute to the teaching of, and understanding of, world history and global studies. Those who wish to propose a review project should contact the Chief Editor directly.

Ocean of Trade: South Asian Merchants, Africa and the Indian Ocean, c. 1750-1850. Pedro Machado. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9781107070264 For Full Article Edited by Birgit Schneider (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit educational read more »


Beijing’s Power and China’s Borders: Twenty Neighbors in Asia. Bruce A. Elleman, Stephen Kotkin, and Clive Schofield, eds. Armonk, NY and London, England: Routledge , 2013. ISBN: 9780765627643 For Full Article Edited by Karen Rosenflanz (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines read more »


The Indian Ocean: Oceanic Connections and the Creation of New Societies. Abdul Sheriff and Engseng Ho, eds.  London: Hurst & Company, 2014. ISBN-10: 1849044260 For Full Article Edited by Martin Pflug (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's read more »


Voices from the Shifting Russo-Japanese Border: Karafuto/Sakhalin.   Svetlana Paichadze and  Philip Seaton. (eds.) Abingdon: Routledge, 2015.  ISBN: 9781138804784 For Full Article Edited by Martin Pflug (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit educational open-access policy. read more »


Africanizing Democracies: 1980-Present.   Alicia Decker and Andrea Arrington.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.  ISBN: 9780199915392 For Full Article Edited by Ashley Dressel (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit educational open-access policy. read more »


European Slave Trading in the Indian Ocean, 1500-1850. Richard B. Allen. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780821421079 For Full Article Edited by Birgit Schneider (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit educational open-access policy. read more »


Eurasian: Mixed Identities in the United States, China, and Hong Kong, 1842—1943. Emma Jinhua Teng. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780520276277 For Full Article Edited by Karen Rosenflanz (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit read more »


Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans. Alison Owings. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780813549651 For Full Article Edited by Sarah R. Hamilton (c) 2017 The Middle Ground Journal , Number 15, Fall, 2017. http://TheMiddleGroundJournal.org See Submission Guidelines page for the journal's not-for-profit educational open-access policy. read more »


Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade. Gabrielle Hecht. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780262017268     In common usage and popular understanding, the term “nuclear” tends to be closely associated with power plants, bombs, radioactive medicine, and other high-visibility technologies wielded by the world’s most powerful industrialized read more »


Rice: Global Networks and New Histories. Bray, Francesca, Peter A. Coclanis, Edda L. Fields-Black, and Dagmar Schäfer, eds. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015. ISBN: 9781107044395 In recent years, historians have increasingly come to recognize the value of studies of commodities, with particular emphasis being placed upon foodstuffs. Beyond the read more »


The World Hunt: An Environmental History of the Commodification of Animals. John F. Richards. Berkeley: The University of California Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780520282537 This publication is an interesting selection for the California World History series. The four chapters included in the book were originally published in a large, synthetic environmental read more »


Chinese and Japanese Films on the Second World War. Edited by King-fai Tam, Timothy Y. Tsu, and Sandra Wilson. Oxon and NY: Routledge, 2015. ISBN: 9781138791039 China and Japan engaged in a prolonged war called the Sino-Japanese War from 1937 to 1945. In world history this conflict is often understood read more »


Crude Reality: Petroleum in World History.   Brian C. Black. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2012. ISBN: 9780742556333 In Crude Reality, historian Brian Black argues that oil is a “terribly irrational resource” (p. 67). The complex fluid geology of oil deposits, its immense stored chemical energy, and the read more »


A Global History of War: From Assyria to the Twenty-First Century. Gérard Chaliand. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780520283619 The title of Gérard Chaliand’s book, A Global History of War, promises more than the book offers. The book does not examine warfare around the globe, nor does it read more »


From Development to Dictatorship: Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era. Thomas Field, Jr. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2014.  ISBN: 9780801452604 History does not repeat itself but it sure rhymes, as the old adage says.  Indeed, old strategies are resurfacing in the wake of modern threats from read more »


Migration and New Media: Transnational Families and Polymedia. Mirca Madianou and Daniel Miller. Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2012. ISBN: 9780415679282      In their work Migration and New Media: Transnational Families and Polymedia, Mirca Madianou and Daniel Miller combine their ethnographic research with Filipino migrant parents and their children with a read more »


Empires of Coal: Fueling China’s Entry into the Modern World Order, 1860-1920. Shellen Xiao Wu. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015. ISBN: 9780804792844 In recent years, “China in the world” has become a new buzz word in both research works and innovative curricula. This new theme calls for research not on read more »


The Third Asiatic Invasion: Empire and Migration in Filipino America, 1898-1946. Rick Baldoz. New York: New York University Press, 2010. ISBN: 9780841791097 The United States prefers to ignore its history as a colonial power, conquering the Philippines as well as several other Spanish possessions in the Pacific and the Caribbean read more »


Migration: A World History. Michael Fisher. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780199764334 The stated goal of Michael Fisher’s Migration, part of the larger Oxford New World History series, is to move away from “old” ways of approaching world history. As the editors of the series clearly read more »


Ottoman-Iranian Borderlands: Making a Boundary, 1843-1914. Sabri Ates. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. ISBN: 9781107033658    This work offers a well-researched study of the border areas between the Ottoman Empire (Turkey) and Iran focused on the period from the middle of the 19th century until the first part of the 20th read more »


Violent Intermediaries: African Soldiers, Conquest, and Everyday Colonialism in German East Africa. Michelle Moyd. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780821420898 This is a social history of the German colonial army, the Schutztruppe, in German East Africa (GEA), from its hasty creation in 1889 until its disbandment at the end read more »


Hacking the Academy: New Approaches to Scholarship and Teaching from Digital Humanities. Daniel J. Cohen & Tom Scheinfeldt, Eds. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2015. ISBN: 9780472051984 Digital humanities is a popular buzz word which has been increasingly used in various institutions of higher education over the past few read more »


Islam, Orientalism and Intellectual History: Modernity and the Politics of Exclusion since Ibn Khaldun. Mohammad Salama. London: I.B. Tauris, 2013. ISBN: 9781780764504 This book examines the relationship between Islam and the West from the point of view of intellectual history during the Enlightenment, colonialism, and the postcolonial era. As Salama read more »


Loci Sacri: Understanding Sacred Places. T.Coomans, H. De Dijn, J. De Maeyer, R. Heynickx, and B. Verschaffel (eds.)  Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9789058678423 As a historian of Africa and as a teacher of world history, I am very intrigued by the subject of sacred spaces as a way read more »


A Short History of Film: Second Edition.   Wheeler Winston Dixon and Gwendolyn Audrey Foster.  New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2013.  ISBN: 9780813560557 Wheeler Winston Dixon and Gwendolyn Audrey Foster’s A Short History of Film provides an excellent starting point into the study of film history.  The work read more »


Imagic Moments: Indigenous North American Film. Lee Schweninger. London: The University of Georgia Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780820345154 Lee Schweninger’s book Imagic Moments: Indigenous North American Film is the latest text to examine the cinematic achievements of Aboriginal directors and actors in the rich and increasingly popular field of North American read more »


Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico, 1750-1856. Sonya Lipsett-Rivera. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780803238336 Sonya Lipsett-Rivera opens Gender and the Negotiation of Daily Life in Mexico with the assertion that “on a day-to-day basis the aspects of life that most preoccupied people were not read more »


The Feedback Loop: Historians Talk about the Links between Research and Teaching. Antoinette M. Burton, et. al. eds. Washington, D.C: The American Historical Association, 2013. ISBN: 9780872292011 Explaining what I do as a historian is often a difficult task. Much of society -- many of my students included – assume read more »


Inka Human Sacrifice and Mountain Worship: Strategies for Empire Unification. Thomas Besom. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780826353078 The consolidation of the Inka Empire in only 90 years, for Thomas Besom, is one of the most exceptional events in South American history.  Most scholars in the field, read more »


Excavating Modernity: The Roman Past in Fascist Italy. Joshua Arthurs. New York: Cornell University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780801449987     Throughout contemporary academic spheres, recent discourse revolving around the history of Fascism has turned towards the regime’s vision of modernism. According to Excavating Modernity, the implication of said scholarly approach necessitates read more »


Mark My Words: Native Women Mapping Our Nations. Mishuana Goeman. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780816677900 Mishuana Goeman’s Mark My Words: Native Women Mapping Our Nations challenges readers to think about how indigenous North American women’s writing creates maps and spaces that complement and counter colonial, patriarchal, conventionally-considered read more »


Chieftains into Ancestors: Imperial Expansion and Indigenous Society in Southwest China. David Faure and Ho Ts’ui-p’ing, editors. Vancouver and Toronto: University of British Columbia Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780774823692     The scholars whose essays appear in this volume all attempt, in one way or another, to provide a history of southern read more »


The Cuban Revolution: Origins Course and Legacy, 3d ed. Marifeli Pérez-Stable. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780195367089 The Cuban Revolution holds a significant historical place in defining the contours of a society that moved from slavery, through colony, into Cold War, and now into a new global order. read more »


A History of Early Southeast Asia: Maritime Trade and Societal Development, 100-1500. Kenneth R. Hall. New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2011. ISBN: 9780742567610 In A History of Early Southeast Asia: Maritime Trade and Societal Development, 100-1500, historian Kenneth Hall offers a useful overview of Southeast Asian history in the era read more »


The Ransom of the Soul: Afterlife and Wealth in Early Western Christianity.   Peter Brown.  Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2015.  ISBN: 9780674967588 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for read more »


Ends of Empire: Asian American Critique and the Cold War. Jodi Kim. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2010. ISBN: 9780816655922 American interventions in East Asia, Cold War epistemology, and Asian American cultural productions all receive due reconsideration of their interrelationships in Jodi Kim’s 2010 monograph, Ends of Empire. In this read more »


Divided Rule: Sovereignty and Empire in French Tunisia, 1881-1938. Mary Dewhurst Lewis. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780520279155 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for read more »


Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line. Theresa Runstedtler. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780520280113 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- read more »


Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War. Ari Kelman and Jonathan Fetter-Vorm.  New York: Hill and Wang, 2015.  ISBN: 9780809094745 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more read more »


Revolutions Without Borders: The Call to Liberty in the Atlantic World. Janet Polasky. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015. ISBN: 9780300208948 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more read more »


An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. Boston, Massachusetts: Beacon Press Books, 2014. ISBN: 9780807057834 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more information, please see HERE. read more »


Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe’s Early Modern World. Benjamin Schmidt. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. ISBN: 9780812246469 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more information, please see read more »


Theatre and the State in Singapore: Orthodoxy and Resistance. Terence Chong. New York: Routledge, 2011. ISBN: 9780415584487 As art proves to be a foundational component of culture, interrogating the institution of art sheds light on a culture’s identity. In the detailed and focused cultural study, Theatre and the State of read more »


Borrowed Light: Vico, Hegel, and the Colonies. Timothy Brennan. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780804790543 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more information, please see HERE. Timothy Brennan’s read more »


Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory, and Silence in Rwanda. Jennie E. Burnet. Madison:  University of Wisconsin Press, 2012.  ISBN: 9780299286446 In this captivating story of one of the greatest travesties thrust upon the world, Jennie E. Burnet’s work on Rwanda, and the impact of its 1994 genocide casts its read more »


Edible Histories, Cultural Politics: Towards a Canadian Food History. Ranca Iacovetta, Valerie J. Korinek, Mariene Epp, eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2012. ISBN: 9781442644762 (bound) ISBN: 9781442612839 (pbk.) Born out of a 2008 workshop funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and held at Conrad Grebel University read more »


History and Popular Memory: The Power of Story in Moments of Crisis. Paul A. Cohen. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780231166362 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- read more »


Ambivalent Encounters: Childhood, Tourism, and Social Change in Banaras, India. Jenny Huberman. New Brunswick, NJ and London: Rutgers University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780813554068     Jenny Huberman, an anthropologist, provides us with an apt ethnographic study on children, tourism, and the place of power in working class life. Her place of read more »


Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World. Gary Wilder. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2015. ISBN: 9780822358503 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more information, read more »


Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution. Kathleen Du Val. New York: Random House, 2015. ISBN: 9781400068951 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more information, please read more »


Cosmopolitan Africa: 1700–1875. Trevor R. Getz. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780199764709 In the late nineteenth century, European leaders such as Jules Ferry, the Prime Minister of France, and Joseph Chamberlain, the British Secretary of State for the Colonies, believed the West had a duty to civilize Africans. read more »


Empire’s Children: Child Emigration, Welfare, and the Decline of the British World, 1869-1967. Ellen Boucher. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014. ISBN: 9781107041387 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for read more »


Teaching Africa: A Guide for the 21st-Century Classroom.   Brandon D. Lundy and Solomon Negash.  Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2013.   ISBN: 9780253008213     Teaching about Africa in the American university system can be a daunting task.  Students typically arrive to campus with little knowledge of the continent, its read more »


Before Orientalism: Asian Peoples and Cultures in European Travel Writing, 1245-1510. Kim M. Phillips. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. ISBN: 9780812245486 This essay is a part of our series, Using Book Reviews as a Teaching Tool – University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, Department of History -- for more read more »


Colonial Africa, 1884–1994. Dennis Laumann. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN: 9780199796397 Over the past 5–10 years, African Studies pedagogy has benefited immensely from publications in three book series designed for use in undergraduate classrooms: Ohio Short Histories of Africa (Ohio Univ. Press & Jacana), Africa in World History read more »