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Ncea Level 3 History Essay Exemplars

History - annotated exemplars

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An annotated exemplar is an extract of student evidence, with a commentary, to explain key aspects of the standard. It assists teachers to make assessment judgements at the grade boundaries.

Level 1

  • AS91001 - Carry out an investigation of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders (1.1)
  • AS91002 - Demonstrate understanding of an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders (1.2)
  • AS91004 - Demonstrate understanding of different perspectives of people in an historical event of significance to New Zealanders (1.4)

Level 2

  • AS91229 - Carry out an inquiry of an historical event or place that is of significance to New Zealanders (2.1)
  • AS91230 - Examine an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders (2.2)
  • AS91232 - Interpret different perspectives of people in an historical event that is of significance to New Zealanders (2.4)

Level 3

  • AS91434 - Research an historical event or place of significance to New Zealanders, using primary and secondary sources (3.1)
  • AS91435 - Analyse an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders (3.2)
  • AS91437 - Analyse different perspectives of a contested event of significance to New Zealanders (3.4)

 

For Merit, the student needs to analyse, in depth, an historical event, or place, of significance to New Zealanders.

This involves explaining key historical ideas using in-depth supporting evidence.

This student has mostly presented the evidence through key historical ideas which include supporting evidence (2) (4) (7) (10) (14) (15). Supporting evidence is in-depth in places (7) (11). There is some use of primary material as well (6) (8) (9).

The student’s own explanations for events are presented in places throughout the evidence (10) (12), particularly in the last section (13). The significance of the event to New Zealanders is clearly addressed.

For a more secure Merit, the student could ensure that paragraphs which begin with a key historical idea stay with the idea rather than moving on to different material (1). Merely describing what happened in an historical event is not by itself an analysis.

Some sections of straight description of events (3) (4) (5) could be supported with the student’s own explanations/analysis. Evidence that historians have different interpretations of the event could be introduced.